Overview

The Translational Neuromuscular Disease Research Laboratory, led by Nathan P. Staff, M.D., Ph.D., utilizes a wide range of methodologies to study basic biological mechanisms of neuromuscular disease and their direct application to patient care.

In the Translational Neuromuscular Disease Research Laboratory, Dr. Staff's research team investigates the molecular biology of peripheral nerve disorders, with a focus on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN).

Human biosample collection is another area of research for the Translational Neuromuscular Disease Research team at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Staff's research team works diligently to provide opportunities for people who have neuromuscular disease to volunteer by providing biosamples. This collaboration helps researchers understand their diseases with the ultimate goal of finding a cure.

Finally, the Translational Neuromuscular Disease Research team participates in clinical trials. For new therapies to become available for patients, clinical trials must be completed to ensure safety and benefits. Dr. Staff helps lead a clinical research team that performs clinical trials that test therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and CIPN. Working with industry and academic partners, the research team has opened multiple clinical trials for Mayo Clinic patients. Notably, in collaboration with Mayo Clinic's IMPACT laboratory and Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dr. Staff and his colleagues are at the leading edge of mesenchymal stem cell therapies for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Support the research

Your support of the Translational Neuromuscular Disease Research Laboratory at Mayo Clinic is vital to advancing new discoveries and treatment of ALS, motor neuron diseases and peripheral neuropathy. Supporting the research of Dr. Staff's Translational Neuromuscular Disease Research Lab helps accomplish the development of treatments in the laboratory setting and then apply them in clinical trials.

About Dr. Staff

Dr. Staff is a neurologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and an associate professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science. His research focus is to discover new treatments or prevent peripheral nervous system damage that occurs after surgery, from chemotherapy and ALS.