A Study to Analyze the Amount of Antibiotic Absorbed into Tissues Comparing Two Different Modes of Administration

Overview

About this study

This study aims to investigate whether administration of vancomycin intravenously via a Bier block, typically a method for providing regional anesthesia in the upper extremity, leads to higher soft tissue and bone antibiotic concentrations compared to routine intravenous administration.  Higher tissue concentrations could be desirable for prophylaxis in complex upper extremity reconstruction, or for treatment of difficult infections.

Participation eligibility

Participant eligibility includes age, gender, type and stage of disease, and previous treatments or health concerns. Guidelines differ from study to study, and identify who can or cannot participate. There is no guarantee that every individual who qualifies and wants to participate in a trial will be enrolled. Contact the study team to discuss study eligibility and potential participation.

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients undergoing upper extremity reconstruction by a single surgeon.
  • Surgical cases will include:
    • Trapeziectomy/suspensionplasty;
    • PIPJ/MPJ arthroplasty;
    • Proximal row carpectomy;
    • Distal ulnar resection;
    • Distal radius fracture fixation.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Inability to adequately cannulate a superficial vein in the upper extremity within 5 minutes of tourniquet inflation.
  • Evidence of subcutaneous extravasation in Bier block group.
  • History of renal dysfunction.
  • Vancomycin allergy.
  • ASA ≥ 3.
  • History of lung cancer.
  • Known HIV infection.
  • History of organ transplantation.

Participating Mayo Clinic locations

Study statuses change often. Please contact the study team for the most up-to-date information regarding possible participation.

Mayo Clinic Location Status Contact

Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

Kevin Renfree, M.D.

Open for enrollment

Contact information:

Kevin Renfree M.D.

Renfree.Kevin@mayo.edu

More information

Publications

Publications are currently not available

Study Results Summary

Not yet available

Supplemental Study Information

Not yet available

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CLS-20514208

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