A Study to Compare the Mayo Orthostatic Symptom Scale (MOSS) and Orthostatic Hypotension Daily Activities Scale (OHDAS)

Overview

About this study

The purpose of this study is to validate Mayo Orthostatic Symptom Scale (MOSS) as not only a valid method of assessing the impact orthostatic hypotension (OH) symptoms have on a patient’s daily activity but is superior to Orthostatic Hypotension Daily Activities Scale (OHDAS) in its correlation with the objective measure of adrenergic failure.

Participation eligibility

Participant eligibility includes age, gender, type and stage of disease, and previous treatments or health concerns. Guidelines differ from study to study, and identify who can or cannot participate. There is no guarantee that every individual who qualifies and wants to participate in a trial will be enrolled. Contact the study team to discuss study eligibility and potential participation.

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age ≥ 18 years old.
  • Completed autonomic reflex screen (ARS).
  • OH on HUT for OH group (n=100), regardless of the state of their autonomic reflexes.
  • No OH for control group (n=25), regardless of the state of their autonomic reflexes.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients unable to give verbal consent and/or complete questionnaire due to medical condition or language barrier (non-English speakers, blind, or illiterate).
  • Very disabled patients (when chair or bed bound) for reasons other than OH.
  • Invalid/limited testing due to technical or patient related difficulties.
  • Age <18 years old.
  • Pregnant women

Participating Mayo Clinic locations

Study statuses change often. Please contact the study team for the most up-to-date information regarding possible participation.

Mayo Clinic Location Status Contact

Rochester, Minn.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

Phillip Low, M.D.

Contact us for the latest status

Contact information:

Phillip Low M.D.

(507)284-3375

low@mayo.edu

More information

Publications

Publications are currently not available

Study Results Summary

Not yet available

Supplemental Study Information

Not yet available

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CLS-20467542

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