A Study to Evaluate Sex Disparities in Arthrogenic Muscle Inhibition

Overview

About this study

Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures disproportionately affect female athletes at a rate 4-6 times greater than male counterparts. In addition, females have a reinjury rate 16 times that of healthy female controls and 4 times that of male ACL reconstruction (ACLR) counterparts. After ACL injury and throughout rehabilitation, a ubiquitous impairment that limits athlete progression to return to sport (RTS) is atrophy of the musculature surrounding the knee, termed arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI).The focus of the study is to develop an objective, reproducible, and reliable measure of neuromotor activation (directly correlated with AMI) and neuromuscular elicited muscle stiffness for both injury prevention and rehabilitation.

Participation eligibility

Participant eligibility includes age, gender, type and stage of disease, and previous treatments or health concerns. Guidelines differ from study to study, and identify who can or cannot participate. There is no guarantee that every individual who qualifies and wants to participate in a trial will be enrolled. Contact the study team to discuss study eligibility and potential participation.

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy, active individuals, both control subjects and individuals that have undertaken ACL reconstruction in the past year

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Lower extremity injury/surgery in past 6 months other than ACL injury
  • Neurological disorders
  • Paralysis
  • Neuromuscular disease
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Exercise-induced injury
  • Asthma
  • Pregnancy

Participating Mayo Clinic locations

Study statuses change often. Please contact the study team for the most up-to-date information regarding possible participation.

Mayo Clinic Location Status Contact

Rochester, Minn.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

Nathan Schilaty, D.C., Ph.D.

Open for enrollment

Contact information:

Timothy Hewett Ph.D.

More information

Publications

Publications are currently not available

Study Results Summary

Not yet available

Supplemental Study Information

Not yet available

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CLS-20307913

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