Genetic Investigations in Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection (SCAD)

Overview

About this study

The purpose of the research is to identify mutations (defects in the genetic blueprint) that cause spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), in other words, spontaneous tears in blood vessels that supply the heart.

Some mutations may be inherited (passed on) from a parent without an apparent blood vessel problem while others may develop for the first time in the affected person.

Participation eligibility

Participant eligibility includes age, gender, type and stage of disease, and previous treatments or health concerns. Guidelines differ from study to study, and identify who can or cannot participate. There is no guarantee that every individual who qualifies and wants to participate in a trial will be enrolled. Contact the study team to discuss study eligibility and potential participation.

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Men and women able to give informed consent and complete a 2 page questionnaire
  • Diagnosis of one or more episodes of spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD)
  • Biological parent of individual with SCAD

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Lack of confirmation of SCAD diagnosis

Participating Mayo Clinic locations

Study statuses change often. Please contact the study team for the most up-to-date information regarding possible participation.

Mayo Clinic Location Status Contact

Rochester, Minn.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

Timothy Olson, M.D.

Closed-enrolling by invitation

What is this? (?)
"Close"
Not open to everyone who meets the eligibility criteria, but only those invited to participate by the study team.

Contact information:

Brenda Speltz B.S., CCRP

(507) 266-2745

speltz.brenda@mayo.edu

More information

Publications

  • Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon idiopathic disorder predominantly affecting young, otherwise healthy women. Rare familial cases reveal a genetic predisposition to disease. The aim of this study was to identify a novel susceptibility gene for SCAD. Read More on PubMed
  • Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an increasingly recognized cause of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) afflicting predominantly younger to middle-aged women. Observational studies have reported a high prevalence of extracoronary vascular anomalies, especially fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and a low prevalence of coincidental cases of atherosclerosis. PHACTR1/EDN1 is a genetic risk locus for several vascular diseases, including FMD and coronary artery disease, with the putative causal noncoding variant at the rs9349379 locus acting as a potential enhancer for the endothelin-1 (EDN1) gene. Read More on PubMed
  • Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) has emerged as an important cause of acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death, particularly among young women and individuals with few conventional atherosclerotic risk factors. Patient-initiated research has spurred increased awareness of SCAD, and improved diagnostic capabilities and findings from large case series have led to changes in approaches to initial and long-term management and increasing evidence that SCAD not only is more common than previously believed but also must be evaluated and treated differently from atherosclerotic myocardial infarction. High rates of recurrent SCAD; its association with female sex, pregnancy, and physical and emotional stress triggers; and concurrent systemic arteriopathies, particularly fibromuscular dysplasia, highlight the differences in clinical characteristics of SCAD compared with atherosclerotic disease. Recent insights into the causes of, clinical course of, treatment options for, outcomes of, and associated conditions of SCAD and the many persistent knowledge gaps are presented. Read More on PubMed
  • Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an under-recognised but important cause of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. We sought to determine the role of medical and molecular genetic screening for connective tissue disorders in patients with SCAD. Read More on PubMed
  • Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a major cause of acute coronary syndrome in young women, especially among those without traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Prior efforts to study SCAD have been hampered by underrecognition and lack of registry-based studies. Risk factors and pathogenesis remain largely undefined, and inheritability has not been reported. Read More on PubMed
  • To develop and assess the feasibility of a novel method for identification, recruitment, and retrospective and prospective evaluation of patients with rare conditions. Read More on PubMed

Study Results Summary

Not yet available

Supplemental Study Information

Not yet available

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CLS-20112222

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