News

  • Symposium on Precision Medicine

    Symposium on Precision Medicine

    Mayo Clinic Proceedings introduced a series of articles, representing diverse medical disciplines, with the goal of describing how precision medicine is changing the way patients, clinicians, and researchers view health and disease.

  • Targeted-Panel Next-Generation Sequencing in Neurology

    Targeted-Panel Next-Generation Sequencing in Neurology

    Targeted-panel next-generation sequencing is leading to a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of many neurologic disorders, enabling individualized precision medicine.

  • Collaboration Essential for Cancer Moonshot Success

    Collaboration Essential for Cancer Moonshot Success

    We must harness the combined efforts of our most talented scientists, clinicians, advocates, and all who are willing to dedicate themselves to the global fight against cancer.

  • Transplant Genomics Enters Collaboration With Mayo Clinic

    Transplant Genomics Enters Collaboration With Mayo Clinic

    Detecting early transplant rejection in patients with stable kidney transplant function provides physicians with a tool to determine the appropriate levels of immunosuppressive therapy.

  • Studying Gut Bacteria To Predict And Prevent Reheumatoid Arthritis

    Studying Gut Bacteria To Predict And Prevent Reheumatoid Arthritis

    Can testing for specific microbiota in the gut help physicians predict and prevent the onset of rheumatoid arthritis?

  • Liquid Biopsies For Earlier Treatment, Better Tracking Of Ovarian Cancer

    Liquid Biopsies For Earlier Treatment, Better Tracking Of Ovarian Cancer

    Liquid biopsies from blood tests and DNA sequencing can detect a return of ovarian cancer long before a tumor reappears.

  • Whole-Exome Sequencing

    Whole-Exome Sequencing: A Rational Approach for 'Diagnostic Odyssey' Patients

    Now patients with rare genetic conditions – who have been evaluated by multiple providers over, sometimes, years, without a diagnosis (i.e., a diagnostic odyssey) – have an opportunity to get answers.

  • Home of National Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program Biobank

    Mayo Clinic to be Home of National Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program Biobank

    This biobank will be a research repository of biologic samples, known as biospecimens, for a longitudinal program that aims to enroll one million or more U.S. participants to better understand individual differences that contribute to health and disease to advance precision medicine.

  • How common are Gliomas

    Molecular Classification May Improve Method Physicians Use to Diagnose and Treat Gliomas

    A new approach categorizing gliomas into five categories according to the presence of three genetic alterations could change the methods used to determine prognosis and treatment options for each individual patient. Glial cell tumors (gliomas) are among the most difficult forms of cancer to treat.

  • Mayo Clinic Biobank

    Precision Medicine Initiative and the Mayo Clinic Biobank

    Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have made a significant commitment to building a scalable biorepository infrastructure, which includes multiple specimen processing laboratories and centralized storage. President Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative invests heavily in a national biobanking initiative that draws on existing collections across the country, of which Mayo Clinic has among the largest collections.

  • Chromosomal Rearrangements

    Mayo Clinic Study Finds Chromosomal Rearrangements Help Distinguish Between Independent Primary Tumors and Metastasis

    A Mayo Clinic study revealed a diagnostic test based on chromosomal rearrangements can trace the lineage of lung cancer to determine whether two separate lung cancers in the same patient are independent tumors or a tumor that has spread to another region of the lung. For patients with multiple tumors, that distinction could mean the difference between early stage cancer that may be cured by surgery and incurable late-stage disease.

  • Computer Power Fuel

    Computer Power Fuels Advances In Medicine

    Mayo Clinic and Minneapolis-based venture firm, Invenshure, have formed Oneome, a genomics interpretation company. Using supercomputer applications, Oneome exports Mayo's extensive pharmacogenomics knowledge in concise, actionable reports to help providers prescribe the right medication at the right dose. Additional genomic applications are being developed.

  • Delicate questions in genetic testing

    Delicate questions in genetic testing

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has revised its guidance on how to handle genetic findings "incidental" to the diseases a patient has. Supporting this guidance, Mayo Clinic researchers report that patients want to have a voice in what they learn or don't learn from whole-genome testing, supporting a nuanced approach. Their findings are published in a recent Mayo Clinic Proceedings article.

  • Mayo Clinic recommends new routine testing for some non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    Mayo Clinic recommends new routine testing for some non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    Researchers have discovered three subgroups of a single type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that have markedly different survival rates. These subgroups could not be differentiated by routine pathology but only with the aid of novel genetic tests, which the research team recommends giving to all patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).

  • Data in action

    Data in action

    Big data is helping Mayo Clinic overcome some difficult challenges, including finding a diagnosis for 6-year-old Javrie Burdell, whose condition had stumped doctors for years. Physicians and scientists in the Individualized Medicine Clinic, part of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, used whole-exome sequencing to discover that Javrie had a disorder so rare that it had no name and was known to affect just 10 children worldwide.

  • Got gas? It could mean you've got healthy gut microbes

    Got gas? It could mean you've got healthy gut microbes

    Could passing gas, in some instances, be a sign that your gut microbes are busy keeping you healthy? Absolutely, says Purna C. Kashyap, MBBS, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist. "Eating foods that cause gas is the only way for the microbes in the gut to get nutrients," he says.

  • Mayo Clinic uncovers a crucial tumor suppression function of p53, the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers

    Mayo Clinic uncovers a crucial tumor suppression function of p53, the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers

    Mayo Clinic researchers have uncovered a novel tumor suppressive role for p53, a gene that is mutated in more than half of all cancers found in humans. The researchers found that loss of p53 function caused overproduction of the kinase Aurora A, an enzyme involved in the process of cell division.

  • Mayo Clinic finds biomarker for Fuchs dystrophy, and more

    Mayo Clinic finds biomarker for Fuchs dystrophy, and more

    Mayo Clinic ophthalmology researchers have found a likely indicator of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy. Though researchers discovered no single genomic variant that caused Fuchs, they found that a repeated noncoding trinucleotide sequence correlated with the condition in patients 68 percent of the time.

  • Mayo Clinic shares lessons learned from genomics clinic for sequencing-based cancer care and diagnostics

    Mayo Clinic shares lessons learned from genomics clinic for sequencing-based cancer care and diagnostics

    About 1.5 years ago, Mayo Clinic opened the world's first integrated multidisciplinary genomics service, the Individualized Medicine Clinic, which uses genomics and next-generation sequencing technologies to personalize treatments for patients. Clinic leaders shared lessons learned in a special issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics Part C.

  • Mayo Clinic develops faster tumor analysis software, speeds cancer discoveries

    Mayo Clinic develops faster tumor analysis software, speeds cancer discoveries

    Mayo Clinic researchers have developed the Binary Indexing Mapping Algorithm, version 3 (BIMA V3), a freely available computer algorithm that identifies alterations in tumor genomes up to 20 times faster and with 25 percent greater accuracy than other popular genomic alignment programs.

  • Researchers use genomic sequencing to help identify new therapies for bile duct cancer

    Researchers use genomic sequencing to help identify new therapies for bile duct cancer

    The Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) have personalized drug treatments for patients with cholangiocarcinoma using genomic sequencing technologies. Clinically important findings suggest that targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) cellular pathways may benefit thousands of patients with this disease.

  • Mayo Clinic scientists propose a breast cancer drug for bladder cancer patients

    Mayo Clinic scientists propose a breast cancer drug for bladder cancer patients

    Mayo Clinic researchers have found amplification of HER2, a known driver of some breast cancers, in a type of bladder cancer called micropapillary urothelial carcinoma (MPUC) and shown that HER2 amplification is associated with particularly aggressive tumors. These findings suggest that administering trastuzumab to MPUC patients with HER2 amplification could improve outcomes, just as it has for breast cancer.

  • An ethical evolution at Mayo Clinic

    An ethical evolution at Mayo Clinic

    Richard Sharp, Ph.D., director of the Bioethics Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, talks about the program, its importance in the context of individualized medicine, and his recent transition from Cleveland Clinic to Mayo Clinic and Rochester, Minnesota.

  • Mayo Clinic studying genomics of antiplatelet heart medication

    Mayo Clinic studying genomics of antiplatelet heart medication

    Which antiplatelet medication is best after a coronary stent? The Tailored Antiplatelet Initiation to Lessen Outcomes Due to Decreased Clopidogrel Response After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (TAILOR-PCI) study, launched in summer 2013, examines whether prescribing heart medication based on a patient's CYP2C19 genotype will help prevent heart attack, stroke, unstable angina and cardiovascular death in patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention, commonly called angioplasty.

  • Using the human genome to customize medicine for patients

    Using the human genome to customize medicine for patients

    Journalist Mary Brophy Marcus takes an in-depth look at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, highlighting the center's activities and vision as well as some patient success stories.

  • Cancer Genetics Inc. and Mayo Clinic announce initial next-generation sequencing projects for joint venture Oncospire

    Cancer Genetics Inc. and Mayo Clinic announce initial next-generation sequencing projects for joint venture Oncospire

    In May 2013, Cancer Genetics Inc. and Mayo Clinic formed Oncospire Genomics, a joint venture owned equally by both organizations. Oncospire announced in November 2013 that its initial projects would focus on developing next-generation sequencing panels for lung cancer, multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma.

  • The push to personalize medicine

    The push to personalize medicine

    Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., former director of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, participated in the U.S. News Hospital of Tomorrow Forum about personalized medicine in November 2013. The primary value should be the needs of patients, he said, and "We can't live up to it unless we turn to genomics."

  • $5 million gift supports Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine in Florida

    $5 million gift supports Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine in Florida

    Cecilia and Dan Carmichael made a $5 million donation to Mayo Clinic to help expand the Center for Individualized Medicine in Jacksonville, Florida. The Carmichaels had previously donated $1 million to Mayo's breast cancer research efforts in Florida after Cecilia was diagnosed and treated for breast cancer at Mayo several years ago.

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