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  • AAML1531, Risk-Stratified Therapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Down Syndrome (AAML1531) Rochester, Minn.

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.

  • ADVL1823, Larotrectinib (LOXO-101, NSC# 788607) for Previously Untreated TRK Fusion Pediatric Solid Tumors and TRK Fusion Relapsed Pediatric Acute Leukemias (ADVL1823) Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the side effects and how well larotrectinib works in treating patients with previously untreated TRK fusion solid tumors and TRK fusion acute leukemia that has come back. Larotrectinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

  • AGCT1531, A Phase 3 Study of Active Surveillance for Low Risk and a Randomized Trial of Carboplatin vs. Cisplatin for Standard Risk Pediatric and Adult Patients With Germ Cell Tumors (AGCT1531) Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how well bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.

  • AGCT1532, Phase 3 Accelerated BEP: A Randomised Phase 3 Trial of Accelerated Versus Standard BEP Chemotherapy for Patients With Intermediate and Poor-risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumours (AGCT1532 P3BEP) Rochester, Minn. The purpose of this study is to determine whether accelerated BEP chemotherapy is more effective than standard BEP chemotherapy in males with intermediate and poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumours.
  • AHEP1531, Pediatric Hepatic Malignancy International Therapeutic Trial (PHITT) (PHITT, AHEP1531) Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to determine how well cisplatin and combination chemotherapy works in treating children and young adults with hepatoblastoma or liver cancer after surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, fluorouracil, vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, etoposide, irinotecan, sorafenib, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy after surgery may kill more tumor cells.

  • ALTE03N1, Key Adverse Events After Childhood Cancer (ALTE03N1) Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this trial is to identify cancer survivors who are at increased risk of developing late-occurring complications after undergoing treatment for childhood cancer. A patient's genes may affect the risk of developing complications, such as congestive heart failure, heart attack, stroke, and second cancer, years after undergoing cancer treatment. Genetic studies may help doctors identify survivors of childhood cancer who are more likely to develop late complications.

  • ALTE05N1, Umbrella Long-Term Follow-Up Protocol (ALTE05N1) Rochester, Minn.

    This clinical trial is studying long-term follow-up in patients who are or have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies. Developing a way to track patients enrolled in Children's Oncology Group studies will help doctors gather long-term follow-up information and may help the study of cancer in the future.

  • ALTE1631, A Randomized Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention Among Children and Adolescents With Cancer (ALTE1631) Rochester, Minn.

    The primary purpose of this study is to compare the effects of a rewards-and web-based physical activity intervention that includes structured social interaction between participants to the same web-based physical activity intervention that does not include structured social interaction on fitness among children and adolescents following treatment for cancer.

  • ALTE2031, StepByStep: A Randomized Trial of a Mobile Health and Social Media Physical Activity Intervention Among Adolescent and Young Adult Childhood Cancer Survivors (ALTE2031) Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to compare a mobile health and social media physical activity intervention versus wearing a physical activity tracker among adolescent and young adult childhood cancer survivors. Regular physical activity helps maintain healthy weight, energy levels, and health. Adolescents and young adults who complete treatment for cancer are often less active. They may gain weight and have more health problems compared to people the same age who have not had treatment for cancer. Comparing the 2 programs will help researchers learn how to increase physical activity levels over time and also how changes in physical activity levels affect health and quality of life over time.

  • ANBL1232, Utilizing Response- and Biology-Based Risk Factors to Guide Therapy in Patients With Non-high-risk Neuroblastoma Rochester, Minn.

    This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.

  • ANBL1531, A Phase 3 Study of 131I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG) or Crizotinib Added to Intensive Therapy for Children With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma (NBL) (ANBL1531) Rochester, Minn.

    Despite recent improvements in outcome for children with newly diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma, cure rates  remain  unsatisfactory.Further, these gains have been the result of interventions during the Consolidation (tandem autologous stem cell transplant) and Post-Consolidation (dinutuximab immunotherapy) phases of treatment, while rates of disease control during Induction have not improved in recent COG trials. The current phase 3 trial seeks to improve the event-free survival (EFS) for children with high-risk neuroblastoma through early integration of promising novel targeted therapies: targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with 131I-MIBG or the ALK inhibitor, crizotinib. After enrollment, patients will receive one cycle of Induction chemotherapy. Subsequent therapy will be based upon MIBG avidity and ALK status. Patients with MIBG-avid, ALK wild type (or ALK unknown) disease will be randomized to one of three arms: A) current COG recommended high-risk therapy including four more cycles of Induction chemotherapy and surgical resection of the primary tumor, Consolidation with tandem transplant and focal external beam radiation, and dinutuximab immunotherapy with isotretinoin; B) current COG recommended high-risk therapy with the addition of a block of 131I-MIBG after the third Induction cycle; or C) current COG recommended high-risk therapy with the addition of a block of 131I-MIBG after the third Induction cycle and substitution of busulfan / melphalan (BuMel) single autologous stem cell transplant in place of tandem transplant. Patients with MIBG non-avid, ALK wild type (or ALK unknown) disease will be non-randomly assigned to receive current COG recommended high-risk therapy without the addition of 131I-MIBG. Patients with ALK aberrant tumors (ALK tyrosine kinase mutation or ALK amplification) will be non-randomly assigned to receive crizotinib added to current COG recommended high-risk therapy. The primary endpoint is EFS and 774 eligible and evaluable patients are anticipated to enroll over approximately 5 years. Key secondary endpoints are toxicity, end-Induction response, and overall survival. Late effects of therapy including targeted therapies will be compared with late effects of current COG recommended treatments Embedded correlative studies seek to understand predictors of benefit and resistance to 131I-MIBG and crizotinib.

  • ANHL12P1, A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Brentuximab Vedotin (SGN35, NSC# 749710), or Crizotinib (NSC#749005, Commercially Labeled) in Combination With Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Patients With Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ANHL12P1) Rochester, Minn.

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

  • APEC14B1, The Project: Every Child Protocol: A Registry, Eligibility Screening, Biology and Outcome Study Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this registry called Every Child, is to collect data and biospecimens from multiple body sources for younger patients with cancer over time. Gathering health information over time from younger patients with cancer may help doctors find better methods of treatment and on-going care.

  • APEC1621, NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH (Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice) (APEC1621) Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and/or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  • ARST1431, A Randomized Phase 3 Study of Vincristine, Dactinomycin, Cyclophosphamide (VAC) Alternating With Vincristine and Irinotecan (VI) Versus VAC/VI Plus Temsirolimus (TORI, Torisel, NSC# 683864, IND#122782) in Patients With Intermediate Risk (IR) Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) (ARST1431) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy (vincristine sulfate, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide alternated with vincristine sulfate and irinotecan hydrochloride) works compared to combination chemotherapy plus temsirolimus in treating patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (cancer that forms in the soft tissues, such as muscle), and has an intermediate chance of coming back after treatment (intermediate risk). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Combination chemotherapy and temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy or combination chemotherapy plus temsirolimus is more effective in treating patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma.

  • NCI COVID-19 in Cancer Patients Study (N-CCaPS): A Longitudinal Natural History Study (NCICOVID) Mankato, Minn., La Crosse, Wis., Rochester, Minn., Eau Claire, Wis.

    The study aims to characterize patient factors, such as pre-existing comorbidities, cancer type and treatment, and demographic factors, associated with short- and long-term outcomes of COVID-19, including severity and fatality, in cancer patients undergoing treatment. The study also is aimed to describe cancer treatment modifications made in response to COVID-19, including dose adjustments, changes in symptom management, or temporary or permanent cessation. Lastely, evaluate the association of COVID-19 with cancer outcomes in patient subgroups defined by clinico-pathologic characteristics.

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  • A Children's Oncology Group Protocol for Collecting and Banking Pediatric Research Specimens Including Rare Pediatric Tumors Rochester, Minn. This study is collecting and storing malignant, borderline malignant neoplasms, and related biological samples from young patients with cancer. Collecting and storing samples of tumor tissue, blood, and bone marrow from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help the study of cancer in the future.
  • A Non-Randomized Phase III Study of Response Adapted Therapy for the Treatment of Children With Newly Diagnosed High Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma Rochester, Minn.

    This phase III trial is studying how well giving combination chemotherapy together with radiation therapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. Giving combination chemotherapy together with radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.

  • A Phase 1/2 Study of CPX-351 (NSC# 775341) Alone Followed by Fludarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF (FLAG) for Children With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Rochester, Minn.

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 (CPX-351) when given with fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back after treatment (relapsed) or is not responding to treatment (is refractory). Liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 is made up of two chemotherapy drugs, cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride, and works to stop cancer cell growth by blocking the cells from dividing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Filgrastim may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving liposomal cytarabine-daunorubicin CPX-351 followed by fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim may be a better treatment for patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and may cause fewer side effects to the heart, a common effect of other chemotherapy treatments for acute myeloid leukemia.

  • A Phase 2 Study of IMGN901 (Lorvotuzumab Mertansine; NSC: 783609) in Children with Relapsed or Refractory Wilms Tumor, Rhabdomyosarcoma, Neuroblastoma, Pleuropulmonary Blastoma, Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) and Synovial Sarcoma Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to see how well lorvotuzumab mertansine works in treating younger patients with Wilms tumor, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, pleuropulmonary blastoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), or synovial sarcoma that has returned or that does not respond to treatment. Antibody-drug conjugates, such as lorvotuzumab mertansine, are created by attaching an antibody (protein used by the body's immune system to fight foreign or diseased cells) to an anti-cancer drug. The antibody is used to recognize tumor cells so the anti-cancer drug can kill them.

  • A Phase I/II Study of CLOLAR® (Clofarabine, IND# 73, 789) in Combination with Cytarabine in Pediatric Patients with Refractory/Relapsed Leukemia Rochester, Minn.

    Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells.

    The purpose of this trial is studying the side effects and best dose of clofarabine when given together with cytarabine and to see how well they work in treating young patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. (Phase I closed to enrollment as of 09/16/09)

  • A Phase II Pilot Study of Bortezomib (PS-341, Velcade, IND# 58,443) Combined with Reinduction Chemotherapy in Children and Young Adults with Recurrent, Refractory or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Rochester, Minn.

    This phase II trial is studying the side effects and best dose of bortezomib and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating younger patients with recurrent, refractory, or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as idarubicin, cytarabine, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) together with bortezomib may kill more cancer cells

  • A Phase II Randomized Trial of Irinotecan/Temozolomide With Temsirolimus (NSC# 683864) or Chimeric 14.18 Antibody (ch14.18) (NSC# 764038) in Children with Refractory, Relapsed or Progressive Neuroblastoma Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide with temsirolimus or dinutuximab work in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma that has returned or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether giving irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide together with temsirolimus or dinutuximab is more effective in treating neuroblastoma.

  • A Phase II Study of Eribulin (NSC# 707389) in Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma Rochester, Minn.

    This phase II trial studies how well eribulin mesylate works in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back after treatment (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). Microtubule inhibitors, such as eribulin mesylate, may stop or slow the growth of tumor cells by disrupting the cell cycle.

  • A Phase II Study of IMC-A12 (Anti-IGF-I Receptor Monoclonal Antibody, NSC #742460) in Children With Relapsed/Refractory Solid Tumors Rochester, Minn.

    This phase II trial is studying the side effects and how well cixutumumab works in treating patients with relapsed or refractory solid tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cixutumumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them.

  • A Phase II Study of MLN8237 (IND# 102984), a Selective Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor in Children with Recurrent/Refractory Solid Tumors and Leukemias Rochester, Minn.

    This phase II trial is studying the side effects of and how well alisertib works in treating young patients with relapsed or refractory solid tumors or leukemia. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

  • A Phase III Randomized Trial for Patients With De Novo AML Using Bortezomib and Sorafenib (NSC# 681239, NSC# 724772) for Patients With High Allelic Ratio FLT3/ITD Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well bortezomib and sorafenib tosylate work in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Bortezomib and sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving bortezomib and sorafenib tosylate together with combination chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.

  • A Phase III Randomized Trial Investigating Bortezomib (NSC# 681239) on a Modified Augmented BFM (ABFM) Backbone in Newly Diagnosed T-Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL) and T-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (T-LLy) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial compares how well combination chemotherapy works when given with or without bortezomib in treating patients with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or stage II-IV T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Bortezomib may help reduce the number of leukemia or lymphoma cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It may also help chemotherapy work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known if giving standard chemotherapy with or without bortezomib is more effective in treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

  • A Phase III Study for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Using Arsenic Trioxide and All-trans Retinoic Acid Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness and long term side effects of using combined tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects.

  • A Pilot Study to Evaluate Novel Agents (Temozolomide and Cixutumumab IMC-A12, Anti-IGF-IR Monoclonal Antibody NSC # 742460) in Combination With Intensive Multi-agent Interval Compressed Therapy for Patients With High-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized pilot clinical trial is studying the side effects and how well giving temozolomide and cixutumumab together with combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cixutumumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving temozolomide and cixutumumab together with combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.

  • A Randomized Open-Label Trial of Caspofungin versus Fluconazole to Prevent Invasive Fungal Infections in Children Undergoing Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial studies caspofungin acetate to see how it works compared to fluconazole in preventing invasive fungal infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia who are undergoing chemotherapy. Caspofungin acetate or fluconazole may help prevent fungal infections caused by chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether fluconazole is more effective than caspofungin acetate in preventing fungal infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia who are undergoing chemotherapy.

  • A Randomized Phase II Trial of Bevacizumab (Avastin) and Temsirolimus (Torisel) in Combination with Intravenous Vinorelbine and Cyclophosphamide in Patients with Recurrent/Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well vinorelbine tartrate and cyclophosphamide work in combination with bevacizumab or temsirolimus in treating patients with recurrent or refractory rhabdomyosarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vinorelbine tartrate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Bevacizumab may also stop the growth of rhabdomyosarcoma by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective when given together with bevacizumab or temsirolimus in treating rhabdomyosarcoma.

  • A Randomized Phase III Study of Sodium Thiosulfate for the Prevention of Cisplatin-Induced Ototoxicity in Children Rochester, Minn.

    RATIONALE: Sodium thiosulfate may reduce or prevent hearing loss in young patients receiving cisplatin for cancer. It is not yet known whether sodium thiosulfate is more effective than no additional treatment in preventing hearing loss.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying sodium thiosulfate to see how well it works in preventing hearing loss in young patients receiving cisplatin for newly diagnosed germ cell tumor, hepatoblastoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma, or other malignancy.

  • AALL08B1, Classification of Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (AALL08B1) Rochester, Minn.

    This research study is developing a risk-based classification system for patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Gathering health information about patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia may help doctors learn more about the disease and plan the best treatment.

  • AALL0932, Treatment of Patients with Newly Diagnosed Standard Risk B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) or localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma (B-LLy) Rochester, Minn.

    This partially randomized phase III clinical trial is studying different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and their side effects and comparing how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

  • AALL1131, A Phase III Randomized Trial for Newly Diagnosed High Risk B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) Including a Stratum Evaluating Dasatinib (NSC#732517) in Patients With Ph-like Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI) Sensitive Mutations (AALL1731) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

  • AAML0631, Risk Adapted Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Using Arsenic Trioxide (Trisenox IND# 103, 331) During Consolidation (AAML0631) Rochester, Minn.

    This phase III trial is studying combination chemotherapy to see how well it works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells.

  • ACCL1033, A Comprehensive Approach to Improve Medication Adherence in Pediatric ALL Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve treatment outcomes.

  • ACNS0831, Phase III Randomized Trial of Post-Radiation Chemotherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma Ages 1 to 21 Years (ACNS0831) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.

  • ADVL1622, Phase 2 Trial of XL184 (Cabozantinib) an Oral Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Multiple Kinases, in Children and Young Adults With Refractory Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, and Other Rare Tumors (ADVL1622) Rochester, Minn.

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

  • AHOD1331, A Randomized Phase III Study of Brentuximab Vedotin (SGN-35) for Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma (cHL) in Children and Adolescents (AHOD1331) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase III trial studies brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy to see how well they work compared to combination chemotherapy alone in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma. Combinations of biological substances in brentuximab vedotin may be able to carry cancer-killing substances directly to Hodgkin lymphoma cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, bleomycin sulfate, vincristine sulfate, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known if combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without brentuximab vedotin in treating Hodgkin lymphoma.

  • ALTE1621, Pharmacologic Reversal of Ventricular Remodeling in Childhood Cancer Survivors at Risk for Heart Failure (PREVENT-HF): A Phase 2b Randomized Placebo-Controlled (Carvedilol) Trial (ALTE1621) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase IIb trial studies how well low-dose carvedilol works in preventing heart failure in cancer survivors exposed to high dose anthracyclines for management of childhood cancer. Patients who received high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy are at a much greater risk for developing heart failure compared to survivors who didn't get any anthracycline chemotherapy. Heart failure happens when the heart muscle has been weakened and can't pump blood as well as it should. Carvedilol may help lower the risk of cardiovascular complications.

  • Biology Study of Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder (TMD) in Children with Down Syndrome (DS) Rochester, Minn.

    RATIONALE: Studying the genes expressed in samples of blood from patients with Down syndrome may help doctors identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    PURPOSE: This research study is looking at blood samples from newborns with Down syndrome.

  • Carcinogen Metabolism, DNA Repair, Parental Exposures and Retinoblastoma Rochester, Minn.

    This laboratory study is looking at genetic mutations and environmental exposure in young patients with retinoblastoma and in their parents and young healthy unrelated volunteers. Gathering information about gene mutations and environmental exposure may help doctors learn more about the causes of retinoblastoma in young patients.

  • Feasibility and Dose Discovery Analysis of Zoledronic Acid With Concurrent Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Osteosarcoma Rochester, Minn.

    RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells.

    PURPOSE: This clinical trial is studying the side effects and best dose of zoledronic acid when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed metastatic osteosarcoma.

  • High Risk B-Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (AALL0232) Rochester, Minn.

    AALL0232 is a COG group-wide phase III study designed for NCI high risk patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from 1-30 years of age. Although event free survival and overall survival continue to increase for children with high risk ALL, CNS disease has become an increasing cause of treatment failure. There is evidence that both dexamethasone and high dose methotrexate prevent CNS relapse. To specifically address the relative increase in CNS events this study will test safety and efficacy of these two therapeutic interventions. The study utilizes a 2 x 2 factorial design with an augmented intensity BFM backbone. Patients will be randomized upfront to receive high dose methotrexate (5 gm/m 2 ) versus Capizzi escalating methotrexate during Interim Maintenance I. A second randomization will compare dexamethasone 10 mg/m2 /day for 14 days versus prednisone 60 mg/m2 /day for 28 days during Induction. Based upon an increased rate of osteonecrosis (ON) observed in patients 10+ years of age randomized to receive dexamethasone during Induction, Amendment #5 restricts the Induction steroid randomization to patients 1-9 years of age, with older patients non-randomly assigned to prednisone during Induction therapy. Patients classified as rapid early responders (RER) will receive one Delayed Intensification course and those classified as slow early responders (SER) will receive two Delayed Intensification courses.

  • Key Adverse Events After Childhood Cancer Rochester, Minn. This clinical trial is studying cancer survivors to identify those who are at increased risk of developing late-occurring complications after undergoing treatment for childhood cancer. A patient's genes may affect the risk of developing complications, such as congestive heart failure, heart attack, stroke, and second cancer, years after undergoing cancer treatment. Genetic studies may help doctors identify survivors of childhood cancer who are more likely to develop late complications.
  • Pazopanib Neoadjuvant Trial in Non-rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas (PAZNTIS): A Phase II/III Randomized Trial of Preoperative Chemoradiation or Preoperative Radiation Plus or Minus Pazopanib (NSC# 737754) Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well pazopanib hydrochloride, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy work and compares it to radiation therapy alone or in combination with pazopanib hydrochloride or combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas that can be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pazopanib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy works better when given with or without combination chemotherapy and/or pazopanib hydrochloride in treating patients with non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas.

  • Phase 2 Study of Inhaled Lipid Cisplatin in Pulmonary Recurrent Osteosarcoma Rochester, Minn. To establish whether treatment with Inhaled Lipid Cisplatin (ILC) is effective in delaying/preventing pulmonary relapse in osteosarcoma patients in complete surgical remission following one or two prior pulmonary relapses.
  • Phase 2 Trial of Response-Based Radiation Therapy for Patients with Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors (CNS GCT) Rochester, Minn.

    Drugs used as chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, etoposide, and ifosfamide work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed central nervous system germ cell tumors.

  • Phase II Study of Denosumab (NSC# 744010), a RANK Ligand Antibody, for Recurrent or Refractory Osteosarcoma Rochester, Minn.

    This phase II trial studies how well denosumab works in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Monoclonal antibodies, such as denosumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.

  • Phase III Randomized Study of Chimeric Antibody 14.18 (Ch14.18) in High Risk Neuroblastoma Following Myeloablative Therapy and Autologous Stem Cell Rescue Rochester, Minn. This partially randomized phase III trial studies isotretinoin with monoclonal antibody Ch14.18, aldesleukin, and sargramostim to see how well it works compared to isotretinoin alone following stem cell transplant in treating patients with neuroblastoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as isotretinoin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody Ch14.18, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumors to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or deliver tumor-killing substances to them. Aldesleukin and sargramostim may stimulate a person's white blood cells to kill cancer cells. It is not yet known if chemotherapy is more effective with or without monoclonal antibody Ch14.18, aldesleukin, and sargramostim following stem cell transplant in treating neuroblastoma.
  • Rare And Cutaneous Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Registry Rochester, Minn.

    RATIONALE: Collecting and storing samples of tissue from patients with cancer to test in the laboratory may help the study of cancer in the future.

    PURPOSE: This research study is collecting and storing tissue samples from patients with rare or cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  • Treatment for Patients with Bilateral, Multicentric, or Bilaterally-Predisposed Unilateral Wilms Tumor Rochester, Minn.

    This phase III clinical trial is studying how well combination chemotherapy and surgery work in treating young patients with Bilateral Wilms tumor and children who are a special risk for forming tumors in both kidneys. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving it after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.

  • Treatment of Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumors (AT/RT) of the Central Nervous System with Surgery, Intensive Chemotherapy, and 3-D Conformal Radiation Rochester, Minn.

    This phase III trial is studying giving combination chemotherapy together with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and an autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant to see how well it works in treating young patients with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the central nervous system. Giving high-dose chemotherapy before an autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as G-CSF, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy or radiation therapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

  • Treatment of Children with All Stages of Hepatoblastoma with Temsirolimus (IND#122782, NSC#683864) Added to High Risk Stratum Treatment Rochester, Minn.

    This phase III trial studies the side effects and how well risk-based therapy works in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed liver cancer. Surgery, chemotherapy drugs (cancer fighting medicines), and when necessary liver transplant are the main current treatments for hepatoblastoma. The stage of the cancer is one factor used to decide the best treatment. Treating patients according to the risk group they are in may help get rid of the cancer, keep it from coming back, and decrease the side effects of chemotherapy.

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