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  • A082002 A Randomized Phase II/III Trial of Modern Immunotherapy Based Systemic Therapy With or Without SBRT for PD-L1-Negative, Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (A082002) Rochester, Minn., La Crosse, Wis., Jacksonville, Fla., Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.

    The purpose of this phase II/III trial is to compare the addition of radiation therapy to the usual treatment (immunotherapy with or without chemotherapy) vs. usual treatment alone in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (advanced) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) whose tumor is also negative for a molecular marker called PD-L1. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a type of radiation therapy that uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. This method uses special equipment to position a patient and precisely deliver radiation to tumors with fewer doses over a shorter period and may cause less damage to normal tissue than conventional radiation therapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, ipilimumab and pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, pemetrexed, paclitaxel and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The addition of radiation therapy to usual treatment may stop the cancer from growing and increase the life of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who are PD-L1 negative.

  • AL-DES-01; RINGSIDE: A Phase 2/3, Randomized, Multicenter Study to Evaluate AL102 in Patients With Progressing Desmoid Tumors (RINGSIDE) Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla., Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of AL102 in patients with progressive desmoid tumors.

  • Blinded Reference Set for Multicancer Early Detection Blood Tests La Crosse, Wis., Mankato, Minn., Eau Claire, Wis., Albert Lea, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to collect blood and tissue samples from patients with and without cancer to evaluate laboratory tests for early cancer detection which may help researchers develop tests for the early detection of cancers.

  • DCC-3014-03-001: A Phase 3, Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Double-blind Study of Vimseltinib to Assess the Efficacy and Safety in Patients With Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor (MOTION) (MOTION) Rochester, Minn.

    This is a multicenter study which aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an investigational drug called vimseltinib for the treatment of tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) in cases where surgical removal of the tumor is not an option. The study consists of two parts. In Part 1, eligible study participants will be assigned to receive either vimseltinib or matching placebo for 24 weeks. A number of assessments will be carried out during the course of the study, including physical examinations, blood tests, imaging studies, electrocardiograms, and questionnaires. MRI scans will be used to evaluate the response of the tumors to the treatment. Participants assigned to placebo in Part 1 will have the option to receive vimseltinib for Part 2. Part 2 is a long-term treatment phase in which all participants receive open-label vimseltinib.

  • LS1781, Phase 2 Trial of High Dose Intravenous Ascorbic Acid as an Adjunct to Salvage Chemotherapy in Relapsed / Refractory Lymphoma and Patients with Clonal Cytopenia of Undetermined Significance Mankato, Minn., Eau Claire, Wis.

    The purpose of this study is to examine how well ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to therapy. Ascorbic acid may make cancer cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy may work better at treating lymphoma.

    In the Clonal Cytopenia of Undetermined Significance (CCUS) Cohort D, we want to find out if ascorbic acid will improve blood counts so fewer transfusions  are required and there is a less likely chance the patient will develop myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or other related myeloid malignancies.

Closed for Enrollment

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