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  • A Phase II Randomized Study of Proton Versus Photon Beam Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Unilateral Head and Neck Cancer Rochester, Minn.

    Compared to IMRT, PBRT is thought to give less radiation exposure to the surrounding healthy tissues. It is possible that side effect rates with PBRT will be lower or the same compared to IMRT, but this has not been well studied to date. Although both of these radiation therapies have been used in the past to treat head and neck cancer, this research study will compare the effects of these two different radiation treatment modalities with each other to see whether PBRT is better, the same or worse than IMRT.

  • A Prospective Observational Study of Proton Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Progressive Locoregional or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz., Rochester, Minn.

    This study observes the clinical efficacy of combining proton SBRT with PD-1 blockade immunotherapy in both the locoregionally recurrent and metastatic settings.

  • A Randomized Phase II/Phase III Study of Adjuvant Concurrent Radiation and Chemotherapy Versus Radiation Alone in Resected High-Risk Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors Rochester, Minn.

    RATIONALE: Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective when given together with chemotherapy or alone after surgery in treating salivary gland tumors. PURPOSE: This randomized phase II/III trial is studying radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy to see how well it works in treating patients with high-risk malignant salivary gland tumors that have been removed by surgery.

  • Phase II/III Randomized Trial of Intensity-Modulated Proton Beam Therapy (IMPT) Versus Intensity-Modulated Photon Therapy (IMRT) for the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer of the Head and Neck Rochester, Minn., Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.

    The goal of this clinical research study is to compare the side effects of 2 radiation treatments for head and neck cancer. The 2 treatments are intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Participants will also receive chemotherapy along with radiation therapy. IMPT is designed to use beams of proton particles to send radiation to the tumor. IMRT is designed to use beams of photon therapy to send radiation to the tumor. Both of these types of radiation treatment may give a full dose of radiation treatment to the tumor while not damaging as much of the healthy tissue around it. This is an investigational study. IMRT and IMPT are delivered using FDA-approved and commercially available methods. Comparing them is investigational. Up to 360 participants will be enrolled in this study. Up to 250 patients will take part at MD Anderson.

  • Randomized Phase II and Phase III Studies of Individualized Treatment for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Based on Biomarker Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Rochester, Minn.

    There are two study questions we are asking in this randomized phase II/III trial based on a blood biomarker, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for locoregionally advanced non-metastatic nasopharyngeal cancer. All patients will first undergo standard concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. When this standard treatment is completed, if there is no detectable EBV DNA in their plasma, then patients are randomized to either standard adjuvant cisplatin and fluorouracil chemotherapy or observation. If there is still detectable levels of plasma EBV DNA, patients will be randomized to standard cisplatin and fluorouracil chemotherapy versus gemcitabine and paclitaxel. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, fluorouracil, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and paclitaxel work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cisplatin and fluorouracil is more effective than gemcitabine hydrochloride and paclitaxel after radiation therapy in treating patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.

Closed for Enrollment

  • A Phase II Study of Intensity-Modulated or Proton Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Sinonasal Malignancy Rochester, Minn.

    The purpose of this study is to determine if intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or proton radiation therapy would result in improved local control rates and lowered toxicity compared to conventional radiotherapy. Data from retrospective studies suggest that IMRT and proton radiation therapy each resulted in promising outcomes for patients with sinonasal malignancy. No previous prospective study has been conducted to evaluate the outcome of sinonasal cancer treated with IMRT or proton radiation therapy.

    The study would also assess if proton radiation therapy would result in equivalent or improved local control rate with similar or lower toxicity compared to IMRT.  It is not known if one is superior to the other in terms of local control and toxicity outcome. It is also not clear if a subset of patients would benefit more from one treatment technology versus the other.

  • A Phase III Study of Postoperative Radiation Therapy (IMRT) +/- Cetuximab for Locally-Advanced Resected Head and Neck Cancer Jacksonville, Fla., Rochester, Minn., Albert Lea, Minn., Mankato, Minn., La Crosse, Wis.

    RATIONALE: Giving radiation therapy that uses a 3-dimensional (3-D) image of the tumor to help focus thin beams of radiation directly on the tumor, and giving radiation therapy in higher doses over a shorter period of time, may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective when given alone or together with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has been removed by surgery.

    PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with radiation therapy given together with cetuximab in treating patients who have undergone surgery for locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  • A Randomized Phase II Study of Concurrent Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Paclitaxel and Pazopanib (NSC 737754)/Placebo, for the Treatment of Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla.

    This randomized phase II trial is studying the side effects and how well giving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and paclitaxel together with or without pazopanib hydrochloride works in treating patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Pazopanib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy and paclitaxel together is more effective with pazopanib hydrochloride in treating thyroid cancer.

  • Randomized Phase II/III Trial of Surgery and Postoperative Radiation Delivered With Concurrent Cisplatin Versus Docetaxel Versus Docetaxel and Cetuximab for High-Risk Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Rochester, Minn.

    This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given together with cisplatin compared to docetaxel or cetuximab and docetaxel after surgery in treating patients with stage III-IV squamous cell head and neck cancer. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or transmit tumor killing molecules to them. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective when given with cisplatin, docetaxel, or cetuximab and docetaxel.

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