The Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center needs people to participate in research studies, including people with mild cognitive impairment, early dementia, Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia. The Alzheimer's Disease Research Center also needs clinical trial participants who haven't been diagnosed with a memory disorder.

Learn more about clinical trials, the different types of clinical studies and deciding to volunteer for clinical studies.

Clinical Trials

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2 studies in Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Rochester, MN.

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Intranasally-Administered Insulin in Adults With Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) or Mild Alzheimer s Disease (AD)
    Jacksonville, Fla., Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Therapeutic Effects of Intranasally-Administered Insulin in Adults With Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) or Mild Alzheimer s Disease (AD)

    Location:

    Jacksonville, Fla., Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    An urgent need exists to find effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that can arrest or reverse the disease at its earliest stages. The emotional and financial burden of AD to patients, family members, and society is enormous, and is predicted to grow exponentially as the median population age increases. Current FDA-approved therapies are modestly effective at best. This study will examine a novel therapeutic approach using intranasal insulin (INI) that has shown promise in short-term clinical trials. If successful, information gained from the study has the potential to move INI forward rapidly as a therapy for AD. The study will also provide evidence for the mechanisms through which INI may produce benefits by examining key cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and hippocampal/entorhinal atrophy. These results will have considerable clinical and scientific significance, and provide therapeutically-relevant knowledge about insulin's effects on AD pathophysiology. Growing evidence has shown that insulin carries out multiple functions in the brain, and that insulin dysregulation may contribute to AD pathogenesis. This study will examine the effects of intranasally-administered insulin on cognition, entorhinal cortex and hippocampal atrophy, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or mild AD. It is hypothesized that after 12 months of treatment with INI compared to placebo, subjects will improve performance on a global measure of cognition, on a memory composite and on daily function. In addition to the examination of CSF biomarkers and hippocampal and entorhinal atrophy, the study aims to examine whether baseline AD biomarker profile, gender, or Apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) allele carriage predict treatment response. In this study, 240 people with aMCI or AD will be given either INI or placebo for 12 months, following an open-label period of 6 months where all participants will be given active drug. The study uses insulin as a therapeutic agent and intranasal administration focusing on nose to brain transport as a mode of delivery.

    NCT ID:

    NCT01767909

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

  2. Effect of Aging and Aerobic Exercise Training on Brain Glucose Metabolism
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Effect of Aging and Aerobic Exercise Training on Brain Glucose Metabolism

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    Aging is associated with a loss of brain function and conditions such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. It is likely that decreased brain metabolism is contributing to the progression of age related degenerative diseases. Aerobic exercise training can increase brain volumes and is associated with decreased risk for degenerative brain conditions. However, little is know about the changes that occur to brain metabolism with aerobic training and aging.

    NCT ID:

    NCT01738568

    IRB Number:

    12-003357

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Robinson, PhD 507-255-9610