The Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center needs people to participate in research studies, including people with mild cognitive impairment, early dementia, Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia. The Alzheimer's Disease Research Center also needs clinical trial participants who haven't been diagnosed with a memory disorder.

Learn more about clinical trials, the different types of clinical studies and deciding to volunteer for clinical studies.

Clinical Trials

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4 studies in Alzheimer's Disease Research Center in Jacksonville, FL.

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Intranasally-Administered Insulin in Adults With Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) or Mild Alzheimer s Disease (AD)

    Jacksonville, Fla., Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Therapeutic Effects of Intranasally-Administered Insulin in Adults With Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) or Mild Alzheimer s Disease (AD)

    Location:

    Jacksonville, Fla., Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    An urgent need exists to find effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that can arrest or reverse the disease at its earliest stages. The emotional and financial burden of AD to patients, family members, and society is enormous, and is predicted to grow exponentially as the median population age increases. Current FDA-approved therapies are modestly effective at best. This study will examine a novel therapeutic approach using intranasal insulin (INI) that has shown promise in short-term clinical trials. If successful, information gained from the study has the potential to move INI forward rapidly as a therapy for AD. The study will also provide evidence for the mechanisms through which INI may produce benefits by examining key cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and hippocampal/entorhinal atrophy. These results will have considerable clinical and scientific significance, and provide therapeutically-relevant knowledge about insulin's effects on AD pathophysiology. Growing evidence has shown that insulin carries out multiple functions in the brain, and that insulin dysregulation may contribute to AD pathogenesis. This study will examine the effects of intranasally-administered insulin on cognition, entorhinal cortex and hippocampal atrophy, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or mild AD. It is hypothesized that after 12 months of treatment with INI compared to placebo, subjects will improve performance on a global measure of cognition, on a memory composite and on daily function. In addition to the examination of CSF biomarkers and hippocampal and entorhinal atrophy, the study aims to examine whether baseline AD biomarker profile, gender, or Apolipoprotein epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) allele carriage predict treatment response. In this study, 240 people with aMCI or AD will be given either INI or placebo for 12 months, following an open-label period of 6 months where all participants will be given active drug. The study uses insulin as a therapeutic agent and intranasal administration focusing on nose to brain transport as a mode of delivery.

    NCT ID:

    NCT01767909

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

  2. Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN)

    Jacksonville, Fla. View Summary

    Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN)

    Location:

    Jacksonville, Fla.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    Dominantly inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents less than 1% of all cases of AD and is an important model for study because the responsible mutations have known biochemical consequences that are believed to underlie the pathological basis of the disorder. Three major hypotheses will be tested: - First, that there is a period of preclinical (presymptomatic) AD in individuals who are destined to develop early-onset dementia (gene carriers) that can be detected by changes in biological fluids and in neuroimaging correlates in comparison with individuals who will not develop early-onset dementia (non-carriers). - Second, because all identified causative mutations for AD affect the normal processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and increase brain levels of amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42), the sequence of preclinical changes initially will involve Aβ42 (production and clearance; reduced levels in cerebrospinal fluid [CSF]), followed by evidence for cerebral deposition of Aβ42 (amyloid imaging), followed by cerebral metabolic activity (functional imaging), and finally by regional atrophy (structural imaging). - Finally, that the phenotype of symptomatic early-onset familial AD, including its clinical course, is similar to that of late-onset "sporadic" AD. The following specific aims will be used to test these hypotheses: 1. Establish an international, multicenter registry of individuals (mutation carriers and non-carriers; pre-symptomatic and symptomatic) who are biological adult children of a parent with a known causative mutation for AD in the APP, PSEN1, or PSEN2 genes in which the individuals are evaluated in a uniform manner at entry and longitudinally thereafter with standardized instruments. 2. In pre-symptomatic individuals, compare mutation carriers and non-carriers to determine the order in which changes in clinical, cognitive, neuroimaging, and biomarker indicators of AD occur prior to the occurrence of dementia. 3. In symptomatic individuals, compare the clinical and neuropathological phenotypes of autosomal dominant AD to those of late-onset "sporadic" AD (using the data sets established by ADNI and by NACC). 4. Maintain the DIAN Central Archive, an integrated database incorporating all information obtained from individuals in the registry to permit analyses within, between, and among the various data domains and also to disseminate the data to qualified investigators in a user-friendly manner. 5. All DIAN participants who wish to know their mutation status will have the costs of genetic counseling and clinical mutation testing paid for by the grant. The clinical genetic counseling and testing is provided as an optional participant benefit and is not part of the DIAN research design.

    NCT ID:

    NCT00869817

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?



    Jacksonville: Dana Haley, MPH CCRP 904-953-9680
                        
  3. Effect of Passive Immunization on the Progression of Mild Alzheimer s Disease: Solanezumab (LY2062430) Versus Placebo

    Jacksonville, Fla. View Summary

    Effect of Passive Immunization on the Progression of Mild Alzheimer s Disease: Solanezumab (LY2062430) Versus Placebo

    Location:

    Jacksonville, Fla.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    To test the idea that solanezumab will slow the cognitive and functional decline of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as compared with placebo in participants with mild AD.

    NCT ID:

    NCT01900665

    IRB Number:

    13-005818

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?



    Jacksonville: 904-953-7103
                        
  4. Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer s Disease (A4 Study)

    Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla. View Summary

    Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer s Disease (A4 Study)

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    The A4 study is a clinical trial for older individuals who have evidence of amyloid plaque build-up in their brains who may be at risk for memory loss and cognitive decline due to Alzheimer's disease. The A4 study will test an anti-amyloid investigational drug in older individuals who do not yet show symptoms of Alzheimer's disease cognitive impairment or dementia with the aim of slowing memory and cognitive decline. The A4 study will also test whether anti-amyloid treatment can delay the progression of AD related brain injury on imaging and other biomarkers.

    NCT ID:

    NCT02008357

    IRB Number:

    13-008325

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: 507-284-1324
                        

    Jacksonville: 904-953-9680