A Study to Evaluate the Feasibility of Rapid COVID-19 Testing in Disadvantaged Populations

Overview

About this study

The specific aims of the study are to:

Aim 1. To determine the feasibility of a community-engaged research partnership to support rapid SARS-CoV-2 testing for symptomatic patients of all ages in the underserved population during the COVID-19 crisis. We will pilot a rapid testing strategy at OCHC using Mayo Clinic Laboratory (MCL) diagnostic processing.

Aim 2. Compare the effectiveness of community-driven messaging in increasing uptake of rapid SARS-CoV-2 testing compared with usual sources of health information. We will draw a simple random sample of OCHC patients (N=1000, age 18+) with 1:1 randomization of communication about COVID-19 and availability of rapid testing from OCHC versus usual sources (control).

Participation eligibility

Participant eligibility includes age, gender, type and stage of disease, and previous treatments or health concerns. Guidelines differ from study to study, and identify who can or cannot participate. There is no guarantee that every individual who qualifies and wants to participate in a trial will be enrolled. Contact the study team to discuss study eligibility and potential participation.

Inclusion Criteria - Aim 1:

  • All patients receiving care at OCHC.

Exclusion Criteria - Aim 1:

  • Individuals < 18 years of age.

There will be no formal recruitment of patients in Aim 1 for this research.

Inclusion Criteria - Aim 2:

  • Patients receiving care at OCHC.
  • Individuals < 18 years of age.

Exclusing Criteria - Aim 2:

  • Individuals > 18 years of age.

Participating Mayo Clinic locations

Study statuses change often. Please contact the study team for the most up-to-date information regarding possible participation.

Mayo Clinic Location Status Contact

Rochester, Minn.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

LaPrincess Brewer, M.D., M.P.H.

Closed for enrollment

Contact information:

Tabetha Brockman

(000) 000-0000

More information

Publications

Publications are currently not available

Study Results Summary

Not yet available

Supplemental Study Information

Not yet available