A Study of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Rehabilitation

Overview

About this study

The purpose of this study is to establish arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI) as a neural mechanism by examining the bilateral neuromotor drive of thigh musculature from AMI progression after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The study will also determine the inhibitory effect of aberrant proprioceptive afferents on quadriceps and hamstring motor output. Furthermore, this study will determine the efficacy of neurofeedback to induce central changes that provide peripheral benefits to muscle activation.

Participation eligibility

Participant eligibility includes age, gender, type and stage of disease, and previous treatments or health concerns. Guidelines differ from study to study, and identify who can or cannot participate. There is no guarantee that every individual who qualifies and wants to participate in a trial will be enrolled. Contact the study team to discuss study eligibility and potential participation.

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy, active individuals, both control subjects and individuals that are candidates for ACL reconstruction due to recent primary tearing of the ACL

Exclusion Criteria: 

  • Lower extremity injury/surgery in past 6 months other than ACL injury
  • Neurological disorders
  • Paralysis
  • Neuromuscular disease
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Exercise-induced injury
  • Asthma
  • Pregnancy

Participating Mayo Clinic locations

Study statuses change often. Please contact the study team for the most up-to-date information regarding possible participation.

Mayo Clinic Location Status Contact

Rochester, Minn.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

Nathan Schilaty, D.C., Ph.D.

Open for enrollment

Contact information:

Nathan Schilaty D.C., Ph.D.

(507)538-7047

schilaty.nathan@mayo.edu

Minneapolis, Minn.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

Nathan Schilaty, D.C., Ph.D.

Closed for enrollment

Contact information:

Nathan Schilaty D.C., Ph.D.

(507)538-7047

schilaty.nathan@mayo.edu

More information

Publications

Publications are currently not available

Study Results Summary

Not yet available

Supplemental Study Information

Not yet available