About

The Integrated Carbohydrate Physiology and Translation Laboratory focuses on understanding the integrative physiology of glucose metabolism in people with diabetes and without diabetes.

The long-term goal of this research team is to develop rational and effective therapies for the treatment and prevention of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications.

The Integrated Carbohydrate Physiology and Translation Laboratory makes extensive use of stable and radioactive isotopes, organ catheterization (hepatic, leg and forearm) and mathematical models to answer research questions related to their programs.

The research team also uses glucose and insulin clamps, oral glucose tolerance tests, mixed meal tests and intravenous glucose tests to assess the impact of physiologic changes in glucose, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, incretins and various substrates (such as free fatty acids) on carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism in people with diabetes and without diabetes.

This line of investigation was pioneered by Robert A. Rizza, M.D., of Mayo Clinic. In the late 1970s and early '80s, Dr. Rizza conducted experiments with inpatient clinical research-based IV insulin Biostator — the first artificial pancreas.

The Integrated Carbohydrate Physiology and Translation Laboratory is continuing to research novel aspects of type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.

Developing an artificial pancreas

The laboratory has come full circle in an attempt to close the loop for type 1 diabetes. The laboratory hopes to accelerate approval of the closed-loop/artificial endocrine pancreas for treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

By implementing closed-loop studies, the research team can study, define, understand and develop physiological models of integrative physiology related to the insulin-glucose system in people with type 1 diabetes.

A better understanding of the insulin-glucose system as it relates to meals, physical activity and other factors, such as menstrual or sleep cycles, will help inform, develop, refine and validate personalized, state-of-the-art closed-loop artificial pancreas systems to improve the quality of life in people with type 1 diabetes.

The lab wants to improve existing methods and develop innovative techniques to measure physiological parameters related to these variables.

The Integrated Carbohydrate Physiology and Translation Laboratory is testing an ambulatory artificial pancreas using subcutaneous glucose sensing and insulin delivery.

About the researchers

The Integrated Carbohydrate Physiology and Translation Laboratory has three principle investigators.

Ananda Basu, MBBS, M.D.
Dr. Basu is a consultant in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism, & Nutrition at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. He is a professor of medicine at the College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Basu received his medical degree from Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry University, India.

Rita Basu, M.D.
Dr. Basu is a career scientist in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism, & Nutrition at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. She is a professor of medicine at the College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Basu received her medical degree from Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry University, India.

Yogish C. Kudva, MBBS
Dr. Kudva is a consultant in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism, & Nutrition. He also has joint appointments in Transfusion Medicine and in Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. He is a professor of medicine at the College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

Dr. Kudva received his medical degree from St. John's Medical College, Bangalore University, Bangalore, India.