Overview

  • Deparaffinized rat kidney tissue section was stained for gamma tubulin (green) and the Hoechest stain staining nuclei blue

    Deparaffinized rat kidney tissue section was stained for gamma tubulin (green) and the Hoechest stain staining nuclei blue. The proximal tubule cells are shown; brush border is visible on the apical border of these cells. Image was obtained using a Zeiss LSM 510 confocal microscope (x100 objective).

  • Artist's impression of a polycystic kidney.

    Artist's impression of a polycystic kidney.

  • Deparaffinized mouse kidney tissue stained for gamma tubulin (green) demonstrating primary cilia on tubule cells; apical staining for fybrocystin (red) also seen.

    Deparaffinized mouse kidney tissue stained for gamma tubulin (green) demonstrating primary cilia on tubule cells; apical staining for fybrocystin (red) also seen. Zeiss LSM510 confocal (x100 objective).

  • The Kidney is composed of millions of functional units known as nephrons, which carry out the complex process of blood filtration to make urine.

    The Kidney is composed of millions of functional units known as nephrons, which carry out the complex process of blood filtration to make urine.

  • Deparaffinized rat kidney tissue stained for gamma tubulin (green) demonstrating primary cilia on tubule cells

    Deparaffinized rat kidney tissue stained for gamma tubulin (green) demonstrating primary cilia on tubule cells; Zeiss LSM510 confocal (x100 objective).

  • PA14 domain showing its beta barrel architecture. This domain is contained in fibrocystin and fibrocystin L and sequence comparisons suggest it may have a role in carbohydrate binding.

    PA14 domain showing its beta barrel architecture. This domain is contained in fibrocystin and fibrocystin L and sequence comparisons suggest it may have a role in carbohydrate binding.

  • Renal Physiology.

    Renal Physiology.

  • Artist's drawing of a renal pelvis stone.

    Artist's drawing of a renal pelvis stone.

  • p-ANCA staining of human lymphocytes.

    p-ANCA staining of human lymphocytes.

  • 3D tomographic images (displayed at 40-μm voxel size) obtained from the normal (left) and stenotic (right) kidneys

    3D tomographic images (displayed at 40-μm voxel size) obtained from the normal (left) and stenotic (right) kidneys. Cortex and medulla in the stenotic kidneys showed decreased microvascular density and increased tortuousity compared to controls.

  • High-power view of Necrotizing Glomerulonephritis.

    High-power view of Necrotizing Glomerulonephritis.

  • High-power view of Necrotizing and Crescentic Glomerulonephritis.

    High-power view of Necrotizing and Crescentic Glomerulonephritis.

  • Linear IgG deposition of IgG on the glomerular basement membrane in a patient with Goodpasture Syndrome detected by indirect fluorescence microscopy.

    Linear IgG deposition of IgG on the glomerular basement membrane in a patient with Goodpasture Syndrome detected by indirect fluorescence microscopy.

  • Masangila IgA deposition detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in a patient with IgA nephropathy.

    Masangila IgA deposition detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in a patient with IgA nephropathy.

  • Electron micrograph of a patient with Fabry's disease

    Electron micrograph of a patient with Fabry's disease (angiokeratoma corporis diffusun), a lysosomal storage disease (or lipidosis) with accumulation of glycolipids in the kidneys and other organs. Lamellated lipid inclusions (myeloid bodies) are present within the viscreal epithelial cells (top left).

Clinical Studies

The Mayo Nephrology Collaborative Group (MNCG) is a consortium of nephrologists including Mayo Clinic Rochester, Jacksonville, and Scottsdale, and clinical and academic nephrologists located across the United States interested in developing and conducting prospective studies aimed at treating patients with renal parenchymal diseases.

Read more

Founded in 1963, the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is one of the world's largest groups of practicing nephrologists (kidney specialists).

Each year, our integrated team of 34 nephrologists, together with physician assistants, nurse practitioners, dialysis nurses, patient care and dialysis technicians, renal dietitians and social workers provide care for over 4,000 patients with a variety of kidney diseases. Staff members are organized into a number of specialty clinics to facilitate patient care and research activities.

Mayo Clinic's hallmark is collegial, cooperative, staff teamwork with true multispecialty integration. Together with the most advanced, innovative diagnostic and therapeutic technology and techniques, we offer the ideal environment to diagnose and treat people with kidney disease. Our physicians collaborate with other Mayo Clinic specialists to manage metabolic complications, anemia and blood pressure. Our specialized dietitians provide nutritional counseling, our patient educators prepare patients for dialysis or transplantation, and our social services department addresses issues such as insurance coverage, delivery of in-home services, job retraining, and physical therapy and rehabilitation.

The Division has active inpatient and outpatient consultant services located in the Mayo and Eisenberg buildings along with five hospital services in Rochester Methodist (General Nephrology Consulting Service and Kidney/Pancreas Transplant Service) and St. Marys Hospital (Critical Care Nephrology Service and two General Nephrology Consulting Services). In addition the Division has an extensive network of dialysis units located in multiple cities in Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota.

The Division of Nephrology sponsors innovative programs for both patient-oriented clinical and basic science research programs to elucidate the pathogenesis of renal disease, and define novel diagnostic, preventative, and treatment modalities. The scope of research in the Division reflects the broad nature of the field of nephrology itself and includes programs in acute renal failure, glomerular diseases, polycystic kidneys and other inherited renal diseases, diabetes, chronic renal failure, renal transplantation, hypertension, mineral metabolism, renal stone disease, and renal cell cancer. Clinical research is fostered by close links to the Mayo Foundation Department of Health Sciences Section of Biostatistics. Many of the basic science research programs are conducted in the integrated Nephrology Research Unit that is located in the recently-completed Stabile Building, which facilitates close interaction between principal investigators and improves access to core facilities. Postdoctoral research in the Division is supported by a National Institute of Health-sponsored Research Training Grant in Nephrology which has been in place since 1975. The objective of this program is to prepare scientists for a career in academic Nephrology and basic renal sciences. The Division also sponsors innovative programs for both patient oriented clinical and basic science researchers.