Clinical Trials

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14 studies in Division of Nephrology and Hypertension in Rochester, MN.

  1. A Multicenter, Randomized, Prospective, Open-Label Trial of Rituximab in the Treatment of Progressive IgA Nephropathy
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    A Multicenter, Randomized, Prospective, Open-Label Trial of Rituximab in the Treatment of Progressive IgA Nephropathy

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    Hypothesis: In patients with progressive IgA nephropathy an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of rituximab on Day 1 and Day 15 and Days 168 and 182 is superior to conventional therapy in reducing 24 hour proteinuria, and slowing progression of chronic kidney disease. . 2.0 OBJECTIVES 2.1 Primary Efficacy Endpoints: Percentage of patients in each group achieving complete or partial response as defined below: Complete Response: At 12 months 1. < 300 mg proteinuria/24 hours Pediatric Criteria: First morning void urine protein: creatinine ratio <0.3 2. No greater than a 10% reduction in baseline estimated GFR as determined by MDRD (4 point) formula Partial Response: At 12 months 1) > 50% reduction in 24 hour proteinuria 2) No greater than a 25% reduction in baseline estimated GFR as determined by MDRD formula No Response: At 12 months 1. A 50% reduction, unchanged or increasing proteinuria over baseline levels will be considered no response 2. A greater than a 30% reduction in baseline estimated GFR as determined by MDRD formula 2.2 Primary Safety Endpoints: - Incidence of Infusion Related Reactions: Defined as the development of hypotension, generalized pruritus, chills/rigors, angioedema and/or bronchospasm. - Pulmonary Complications: Defined as a hypoxia, pulmonary infiltrates and/or acute respiratory failure - Incidence of Major Infections: Defined as the development of pneumonia, complicated UTI/Pyelonephritis, Sepsis, and Meningitis. - Development of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) 2.3 Secondary Exploratory Efficacy Endpoints: A) For patients in Groups 1 & 2 consenting to a repeat kidney biopsy at 12 months, a secondary endpoint will include the percentage of patients in experiencing a 25% increase in cortical fibrosis. The response rate will be semi-quantified by the change in cortical fibrosis as measured by changes in Sirius Red staining of interstitial collagen. A patient will be considered a complete or partial response or no response according to the following criteria: Complete: Less than 10% rise in cortical fibrosis as measured by Sirius Red staining and digital image analysis Partial: Rising cortical fibrosis > 10% but less than 25% No Response: Greater than 25% rise in cortical fibrosis over baseline levels-(if patient consents to repeat kidney biopsy)

    NCT ID:

    NCT00498368

    IRB Number:

    07-001944

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Fernando C. Fervenza, M.D., Ph.D. 507-266-7961
                        Shirley A Jennison 507-255-0231


  2. Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network Under the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network Under the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) is a rare disease syndrome responsible for approximately 12% of all causes of end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) and up to 20% of ESRD in children. Treatment strategies for Focal and Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), Minimal Change Disease (MCD) and Membranous Nephropathy (MN), the major causes of NS, include high dose prolonged steroid therapy, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine A, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and other immunosuppressive agents, which all carry significant side effects. Failure to obtain remission using the current treatment approaches frequently results in progression to ESRD with its associated costs, morbidities, and mortality. In the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies (NAPRTCS) registry, half of the pediatric patients with Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome required renal replacement therapy within two years of being enrolled in the disease registry. FSGS also has a high recurrence rate following kidney transplantation (30-40%) and is the most common recurrent disease leading to allograft loss. The prevailing classification of Nephrotic Syndrome categorizes patients into FSGS, MCD, and MN, if in the absence of other underlying causes, glomerular histology shows a specific histological pattern. This classification does not adequately predict the heterogeneous natural history of patients with FSGS, MCD, and MN. Major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of FSGS and MCD have come over the last ten years from the identification of several mutated genes responsible for causing Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS) presenting with FSGS or MCD histopathology in humans and model organisms. These functionally distinct genetic disorders can present with indistinguishable FSGS lesions on histology confirming the presence of heterogeneous pathogenic mechanisms under the current histological diagnoses. The limited understanding of FSGS, MCD, and MN biology in humans has necessitated a descriptive classification system in which heterogeneous disorders are grouped together. This invariably consigns these heterogeneous patients to the same therapeutic approaches, which use blunt immunosuppressive drugs that lack a clear biological basis, are often not beneficial, and are complicated by significant toxicity. The foregoing shortcomings make a strong case that concerted and innovative investigational strategies combining basic science, translational, and clinical methods should be employed to study FSGS, MCD, and MN. It is for these reasons that the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network is established to conduct clinical and translational research in patients with FSGS/MCD and MN.

    NCT ID:

    NCT01209000

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Lori Riess 507-266-1047
                        Shirley Jennison 507-255-0231


  3. Screening for Dent Disease Mutations in Patients With Proteinuria
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Screening for Dent Disease Mutations in Patients With Proteinuria

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    During this study visit, the investigator will draw one tube, about two teaspoonfuls (1 to 1 ½ teaspoons for children), of blood from your arm to obtain white blood cells. These white blood cells will be used as a source of DNA for genetic testing. We will use the isolated DNA to try to identify the gene that is defective in Dent Disease by comparing it with the structure of genes in normal individuals, patients with Dent Disease, and family members for Dent Disease.

    NCT ID:

    NCT01783795

    IRB Number:

    10-006442

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Barbara M Seide 507-255-0387
                        Mayo Clinic Hyperoxaluria Center 800-270-4637


  4. Role Of Phosphorus And FGF 23 In Patients With Dent Disease
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Role Of Phosphorus And FGF 23 In Patients With Dent Disease

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    Patients with Dent disease have suppressed levels of FGF 23 which contributes to hypercalciuria, kidney stones, nephrocalcinosis and renal failure. Supplementation with phosphorus may reduce hypercalciuria.

    NCT ID:

    NCT02016235

    IRB Number:

    13-004774

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Barbara Siede 800-270-4637
                        Alicia M Meek 800-270-4637


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