Frontiers in Proteomics and Nanomedicine

November 11-14, 2007

Program Directors:

The goal of this workshop was to advance current research projects and to identify future collaborations in the nascent field of nanobiotechnology. This gathering included core Minnesota researchers from private industry; the Institute of Technology; the Academic Health Center; and the College of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry/Molecular Biology, and the Cancer Center at Mayo Clinic. This group of diverse scientists is key to the design, development, and implementation of nanotechnology and nanoscience for new therapeutics and detection methods towards addressing important medical challenges such as the challenge of treating and ultimately eliminating cancer.

Mayo Clinic Nanomedicine Initiative:

Nanotechnology is an emerging field with myriads of opportunity for biomedical application. At the heart of the nanotechnology are the nanoparticles, and they can be synthesized into different shapes and sizes with tailorable optoelectronic and physico-chemical properties. The design and development of nanoparticles and nanobioconjugates in conjunction with the development of genomics and proteomics to identify biomarkers raises exciting opportunities for personalized treatment.

Nanotechnology in Angiogenesis-Related Disorder:

Nanotechnology can play a pivotal role in angiogenesis-dependent disorders. Recently, Dr. Mukhopadhyay's group has demonstrated for the first time that inorganic nanorods can be pro-angiogenic and form new blood vessels in chick CAM assay in vivo. Potential applications of this discovery in cardiovascular disease are enormous.

2007 Frontiers in Proteomics and Nanomedicine Images
  • Pro-angiogenic properties of inorganic nanorods

    Pro-angiogenic properties of inorganic nanorods: Chick CAM assays treated with a) TE (tris-EDTA) buffer, b)VEGF165 (50 ng), c, d) 1 and 50 µg of Eu-OH nanorods (Patra, et al. Advanced Materials, 2008). Fluorescence and corresponding phase images of Eu-Phosphate (A, B) and Tb phosphate nanorods (C, D), respectively.

  • Targeted delivery of a low dose of gemcitabine with cetuximab as a targeting agent and gold nanoparticle as a delivery vehicle resulted in significant inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in orthotopic human xenograft model

    Targeted delivery of a low dose of gemcitabine with cetuximab as a targeting agent and gold nanoparticle as a delivery vehicle resulted in significant inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth in orthotopic human xenograft model. The picture depicts the internalization of the nanoconjugate by cancer cells [Inset showing the internalized gold nanoparticles] (Cancer Research, 2008, in press.)