Clinical Trials

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4 studies in Department of Anesthesiology in Rochester, MN.

  1. Perioperative Cognitive Function - Dexmedetomidine and Cognitive Reserve
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Perioperative Cognitive Function - Dexmedetomidine and Cognitive Reserve

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    Postoperative Delirium or PD and Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction or POCD are syndromes of central nervous system dysfunction that significantly complicate the recovery of a proportion of elderly patients following surgery. Delirium is typically a transient syndrome characterized by a de-novo appearance of several pathognomonic behaviors, including disorientation, decreased attention span, sensory misperceptions, a waxing-and-waning type of confusion, and disorganized thinking. PD typically occurs on postoperative days 1 to 3 and is associated with prolonged hospital stays, increased risks for morbidity and mortality and significant health care expenditures. The neuroendocrine stress response to surgery, including the immediate postoperative period, remains an important potential etiologic factor. In particular, our data suggests that stress in the immediate postoperative period is poorly controlled by all anesthetic techniques and the normal diurnal variation in cortisol is suppressed in subjects who develop POCD. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective alpha 2A agonist currently approved for sedation in the ICU. Dexmedetomidine produces analgesia, sympatholysis, and a light sedation characterized by easy arousal. Its action converges on the endogenous substrates for natural sleep to produce their sedative action, an effect that could prove beneficial to elderly postoperative patients. We hypothesize that treatment with dexmedetomidine will diminish both PD and POCD. The essential proposition is that modulation of perioperative stress can ameliorate perioperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction. Based on both the concept of cognitive reserve as well as clinical experience, there is concern that patients with preoperative cognitive impairment are particularly vulnerable to POCD. In general, such patients have been excluded from previous studies. This study is unique in that we will assess all participants for mild cognitive impairment prior to surgery. Assessment of the impact of preexisting cognitive impairment is a secondary aim. A broad goal of this interdisciplinary project is to evaluate POCD, which is primarily an anesthesia concept, in the more general context of dementing illness as explored by geriatric psychiatry.

    NCT ID:

    NCT00561678

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Chrsitopher Jankowski, MD 507-894-9695
                        


  2. Local Assessment of Ventilatory Management During General Anesthesia for Surgery - a Prospective Observational Multi-center Cohort Study
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Local Assessment of Ventilatory Management During General Anesthesia for Surgery - a Prospective Observational Multi-center Cohort Study

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    Research questions - What MV-settings are used during general anesthesia for surgery? - Do MV-settings vary in and/or between centers? - Do MV-settings vary internationally? - Are MV-settings associated with incidence of intra-operative pulmonary complications? - Are MV-settings associated with incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications?

    NCT ID:

    NCT01601223

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Juraj Sprung, MD
                        Shonie Buenvenida


  3. Equivalency Study of the CORA(R) and TEG(R) 5000 Systems
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Equivalency Study of the CORA(R) and TEG(R) 5000 Systems

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    The study protocol specifies testing using multiple reagents which are similar for both the CORA and TEG systems. Tests are run on blood samples taken from patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery and cardiology procedures, at two times throughout the procedure. The tests may be performed at three different pairs of times: Pre-Operation and Post-Protamine, or During Operation (Post-Heparin) and ICU, or Pre-Operation and ICU. Patients are selected at random for determination of which pair of times will be used, as long as the number of patients for each of the three groups is approximately the same. Following the protocol defined in CLSI Standard EP09-A2, equivalence between the two systems will be demonstrated if the conclusions from the Standard Section 7, Interpreting Results and Comparing to Internal Performance Criteria, are found to be acceptable. The study protocol also specifies the testing of blood samples from normal, health volunteer subjects for the purpose of determining CORA System Reference Ranges for all of the reagents used in the study. Reference ranges will be constructed following the guidelines specified in CLSI Standard C28-A3c. All blood samples drawn for this study will use venous blood. Whole blood is not used for these studies; only citrated or heparinized samples are used. All samples are repeated twice (run in duplicate tests). Quality Controls are run on both instruments at a frequency specified by the manufacturers. Results obtained from this testing are not used to make treatment decisions.

    NCT ID:

    NCT01790386

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Mark Ereth, MD 507-255-4235
                        


  4. Red Cell Storage Duration Study
    Rochester, Minn. View Summary

    Red Cell Storage Duration Study

    Location:

    Rochester, Minn.

    Trial status:

    Open for Enrollment

    Why is this study being done?

    The RECESS study will compare the effects of transfusing red blood cell units stored <= 10 days vs. red blood cell units stored >= 21 days, in patients who are undergoing complex cardiac surgery and are likely to need a red blood cell transfusion. The primary hypothesis is that there is a clinically important difference between the effects of shorter-storage red cell units and longer-storage red cell units on clinical outcomes and mortality risk.

    NCT ID:

    NCT00991341

    Who can I contact for additional information about this study?

    Rochester: Greg Nuttall, MD 507-255-3298