Effects of Aging and Aerobic Exercise Training on Brain Glucose Metabolism

  • Study type:

    Interventional What is this?

    Describes the nature of a clinical study. Types include:

    • Observational study — observes people and measures outcomes without affecting results.
    • Interventional study (clinical trial) — studies new tests, treatments, drugs, surgical procedures or devices.
    • Medical records research — uses historical information collected from medical records of large groups of people to study how diseases progress and which treatments and surgeries work best.

Study IDs

  • Site IRB:

    • Rochester, Minnesota: 12-003357
  • NCT ID:

  • Sponsor Protocol Number:


About this study

Aging is associated with a loss of brain function and conditions such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. It is likely that decreased brain metabolism is contributing to the progression of age related degenerative diseases. Aerobic exercise training can increase brain volumes and is associated with decreased risk for degenerative brain conditions. However, little is know about the changes that occur to brain metabolism with aerobic training and aging.

Participation eligibility

Participant eligibility includes age, gender, type and stage of disease, and previous treatments or health concerns. Guidelines differ from study to study, and identify who can or cannot participate. If you need assistance understanding the eligibility criteria, please contact the study team.

See eligibility criteria

Healthy sedentary adults aged 18-30 or 65-80 years of all ethnicities will be eligible. Pregnant women, children, prisoners or other at risk populations will not be recruited.

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 18-30 years or 65-80 years

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Body mass index (BMI) >31 kg/m2
  • Smoking
  • Pregnancy
  • Participation in structured exercise (>2 times per week for 30 minutes or longer)
  • Cardiovascular, metabolic (type 2 diabetes, fasting plasma glucose at or above 110 mg/dL and untreated hypo- or hyperthyroidism) or renal disease
  • Orthopedic problems that would keep them from being able to ride an exercise bicycle, lift weights or do a combination of these exercise
  • Medications that are known to impact on mitochondrial function: Corticosteroids, opiates, benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants, beta blockers, sulfonylureas, insulin, anticoagulants, barbiturates, insulin sensitizers, fibrates (PPAR gamma agonist)
  • Claustrophobia

Participating Mayo Clinic locations

Study statuses change often. Please contact us for help.

Mayo Clinic Location Status Contact

Rochester, Minn.

Mayo Clinic principal investigator

Val Lowe, M.D.

Closed for enrollment

Matthew Robinson Ph.D.