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Potential Research Mentors

  • Young J. Juhn, M.D.
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics
    Dr. Juhn conducts National Institutes of Health-funded research investigating the epidemiology of wheezing and asthma. Dr. Juhn currently mentors Gretchen A. Matthews, M.D.
  • Dennis Wigle, M.D., Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery
    His research interests include molecular determinants of lung organogenesis as well as targeted lung regeneration from an understanding of cell specification in the developing lung. Dr. Wigle has agreed to mentor more than one of our fellows at a time if there is interest. Dr. Wigle currently mentors Christopher A. Collura, M.D.
  • William A. Carey, M.D.
    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    His research focuses on the safety and physiologic effects of providing enteral nutrition to extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants while receiving indomethacin. Additionally, Dr. Carey's interests include the investigation of alveolar development.
  • Christopher E. Colby, M.D.
    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    He is involved in studying the effects of a standardized approach to the mechanical ventilation and resuscitation of ELBW infants. Other areas of interest include simulation-based education.
  • Michael J. Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D.
    Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics and Pharmacology, Division of Pediatric Cardiology
    His research includes sudden infant death syndrome as well as inherited cardiac channel anomalies.
  • Jan van Deursen, Ph.D.
    Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Pediatrics
    His research includes mitotic checkpoint function and chromosomal stability. His lab is also interested in transcriptional coactivators in normal and neoplastic growth.
  • Piero Rinaldo, M.D., Ph.D.
    Professor of Laboratory Medicine, Pathology and Pediatrics
    His research includes expanded newborn screening.
  • Grazia Isaya, M.D., Ph.D.
    Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Pediatrics
    Her research includes the mechanisms that enable the cell to take advantage of the high-energetic yield of oxidative phosphorylation in spite of the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species.
  • Dietrich Matern, M.D., Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Laboratory Medicine, Pathology and Pediatrics
    His research focuses on the improvement and expansion of newborn screening and the development of new diagnostic tests for inborn errors of metabolism. In addition, he and his lab participate in several research projects aimed to develop new treatment strategies for fatty acid oxidation disorders and to characterize the biochemical phenotype of animal models of such conditions.
  • Richard J. Bram, M.D., Ph.D.
    Associate Professor of Immunology and Pediatrics
    His research focuses on molecular signaling events that control cellular behavior in activation of the immune system and in neoplastic transformation. Ongoing projects include studies on the mechanism of action of CAML, an intracellular signal-transduction protein; characterization of TACI, a lymphocyte-specific TNFR family member; and identification of other novel proteins capable of regulating signals important in cell growth, function or transformation.
  • William F. Dunn, M.D.
    Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Adult Critical Care
    Dr. Dunnis the co-director of the Mayo Multidisciplinary Simulation Center. Dr. Dunn is the former program director for the adult critical care fellowship at Mayo Clinic and is also a graduate of the Harvard Macy Institute. His research interests are in educational outcomes of using simulation-based education.
  • Yves Ouellette, M.D., Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    His research interest includes determining the role of systemic inflammation associated with sepsis in mediating decreased gap junctional signaling within the microvascular wall.
  • Slavica K. Katusic, M.D.
    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    Her research focuses on the long-term outcomes of a variety of disease processes utilizing the Rochester Epidemiology Project.
  • Moses Rodriguez, M.D.
    Professor of Neurology and Immunology
    His research is focused on determining the mechanisms of demyelination and remyelination in diseases such as human multiple sclerosis and perinatal white matter disease.
  • Aug 8, 2013
  • ART262182